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Map 24: NH Audubon Society Trails

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Features

  1. Walking trails
Trail Access
PDF Map | Map 24 Printable Friendly Text

Take I-89 to exit 2, turn left off of the ramp onto Clinton Street. At the first blinking light, turn right onto Silk Farm Road. The entrance to the McLane Center is on the left. Most trails begin at the trailhead near the kiosk. Forest Floor Trail (Red Markers): This trail is a short, easy walk through a white pine forest. Wildflowers are abundant during the spring and summer. This trail begins behind the building by the raptor mews.

The Trails

Forest Floor Trail (Red Markers):
This trail is a short, easy walk through a white pine forest. Wildflowers are abundant during the spring and summer. This trail begins behind the building by the raptor mews.

Hiking travel time: About 15 minutes
Distance: 0.4 miles

Great Turkey Pond Trail (Yellow Markers):
This trail leads you through a mixed hardwood forest to the shores of the Great Turkey Pond.
The pond offers opportunities for bird watching and is a breeding area and migration stopping
point for a variety of species.

Hiking travel time: About 55 minutes
Distance: 1.2 miles

Old Orchard Trail (Blue Markers):
This is a great trail for birding and leads you through a variety of habitats. The trail leads to an overlook of the open agricultural field and through a white pine forest and an old orchard. The trail then descends through a wet forest to the shores of the Great Turkey Pond. The trail merges with the Great Turkey Pond Trail, which returns to the Visitors’ Center.

Hiking travel time: About 45 minutes
Distance: 1.0 miles

History

In 1835, a silk farm was located in the vicinity of what is now the Silk Farm Audubon Center.
Mulberry Trees were planted and silk was produced, but the farm was unsuccessful and
abandoned the silk production after only a few years.

In 1938, a hurricane felled millions of trees across the state. The Great Turkey Pond was used to store the logs until they could be cut into lumber. Throughout the state, logs were submerged in water bodies to salvage the wood. The Great Turkey Pond held more wood than
any other water body in New Hampshire.

In 1972, N.H. Audubon purchased the 15 acre property with a small house; the house became
the visitors’ center and land became the wildlife sanctuary. The property is surrounded by land
owned by St. Paul’s School. The School granted a license to allow Audubon to use the land to
create nature trails to the Great Turkey Pond.